DEERS Office and the need for Apostille / Legalized Foreign Documents

If your spouse or child is a foreign national, the foreign documents required to receive a military ID must be translated to English with a Notarized Certificate to be accepted. The Notarized Certificate is called an Apostille or Legalization (terminology depends on the Foreign Government / Consular Service).

WHAT DOCUMENTS ARE NEEDED AT THE DEERS OFFICE?

If your dependants are foreign nationals, any official identification document necessary to receive a military ID will require a certified translation into English. Military One Source is ideal for this translation service, link found here: www.militaryonesource.mil

The official documents required for the DEERS enrollment are:

  • Marriage Certificate
  • Photo ID (e.g. Unexpired Passport, US Driver’s License, or State-Issued ID Card)
  • Birth Certificate
  • Apostille for each Foreign Document

DO I NEED TO OBTAIN AN APOSTILLE?

Yes. Foreign Documents need to receive an apostille by the country of origin. Apostilles authenticate the seals and signatures of officials on documents issued by a foreign government. The apostille allows the foreign document to be recognized internationally.

HOW DO I GET AN APOSTILLE?

In short, contact the local foreign embassy or consulate on their apostille or legalization process.

 

Related Posts:

Foreign Document Translation: Our Recommendation

USCIS Marriage-Based Adjustment of Status Interview in 2020: Tips and Tricks

When Do I Receive The Employment Authorization Card through the Pending I-485 Green Card Application?

 

Disclaimer: This Blog is made available by the lawyer or law firm publisher for educational purposes only as well as to give you general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand that there is no attorney-client relationship between you and the Blog/Web Site publisher. The Blog should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.


Leave a Comment