Virtual Utah Marriage: Alternative to a Proxy Marriage for Immigration Purposes

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You may now Blow a Kiss to the Bride!!!

To begin, a “Proxy Marriage” has a “proxy” or middleman sign on behalf of one of the soon-to-be-spouses. Double Proxy is also a term where two proxies or two middlemen are present to marry the intended spouses.

The State of Utah DOES NOT perform or recognize Proxy Marriage. Instead, they have “CUT OUT THE MIDDLEMAN,” and allow spouses to marry virtually. The Spouses sign their marriage certificate electronically, and the marriage certificate is issued by the State of Utah, making it accepted throughout the United States and for US Immigration Purposes.

A Utah Virtual Marriage, aka Web Conference Ceremony or Video Conference Ceremony, is a valid, legal marriage. The only difference is that the spouses can be anywhere in the United States and the World, and can appear “virtually” before a representative of Utah.

A “Proxy Marriage” for immigration purposes has one MAJOR issue, the “consummation requirement” AFTER marrying by proxy. Meaning, the US Government will NOT recognize a proxy marriage certificate UNTIL/AFTER the spouses have been physically present, in the same city, at the same location, for a period of time. This requirement is to make sure the marriage is real and the Spouses are serious about the marriage. A “non-proxy marriage,” aka a regular marriage or virtual marriage, do not have consummation requirements, the marriage certificate in itself is sufficient to prove a marriage occurred and that is can be recognized by the US Government for immigration purposes.

Thus, the Utah Virtual marriage ceremony is a much better option than proxy marriages.

Utah Website: https://www.utahcounty.gov/dept/clerkaud/PassMarr/RemoteAppearanceFAQ.asp

Related Blog Posts:

Active Duty US Military, Double Proxy Marriage in Montana, and US Immigration

Proxy Marriage and US Immigration: Clarification on the Consummation Requirement

 

 

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