How to apply for a marriage license as an immigrant in North Carolina?

Congratulations on taking the next step, Marriage!

As an Immigrant or someone marrying an immigrant, the marriage process is normally unknown.

Before getting married in North Carolina, a marriage license must be obtained. The following documents must be presented at the time of the appointment:

  1.  Valid photo ID: A valid photo ID includes a Driver’s License or State ID issued by a state or territory of the United States, a US military ID, or a passport
  2. Social Security Card: If you have been issued a social security number, you must provide proof of your full social: Proof must be a social security card, W2 form, pay stub, bank documents or military documents. No handwritten documents will be accepted.

Now you may ask, what if I do not have a Social Security Card?

Applicants who are not eligible for a Social Security number may obtain a marriage license by signing an affidavit attesting to this fact. The affidavit is called “Affidavit In Lieu of Social Security Number”. This document must be signed in the presence of a Notary and can be available at your local Register of Deeds office. A copy of the Affidavit can be found here:

https://www.onslowcountync.gov/DocumentCenter/View/994

Please Note: Foreign ID’s must be accompanied by a certified birth certificate and will be accepted at the discretion of the Register of Deeds.

If you wish to speak with an Immigration Lawyer about the immigration process after marriage, please contact our office to set up an appointment or you may call our office at (910) 526-0066.

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Disclaimer: This Blog is made available by the lawyer or law firm publisher for educational purposes only as well as to give you general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand that there is no attorney-client relationship between you and the Blog/Web Site publisher. The Blog should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.


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